Friday, 11 January 2008

So I've told everyone not to bother me, I'm writing a novel...

Okay. The idea is that I am not writing media tie-in fiction this quarter. Despite my rather snazzy union label proudly displayed, I am going original. Nothing but my mystery novel between now and March 31 when it goes in the mail.

Today I am about 10% behind where I want to be at this point. Not good, but not terribly bad. Close to being on track. I can see myself making it if nothing throws me off or distracts me.

So. In today's e-mail.
1. The novel editor for that British game company I keep mentioning but don't want to name until there's a firm deal tells me she's got a couple of slots open in their upcoming roster. It's an area of their game universe she knows I don't know well, so she's sending me a selection of novels so I can familiarize myself. Then she'll want to see a few high concept pitches ASAP.
2. Head of development for a game company in Seatle sends me sixteen single-spaced pages of particulars on a role playing game they're going to release in the fall (catch the Christmas rush). Wants me to be part of the team writing the fiction and players' reference books for the new IP. Wants me to look over the attached materials and pitch him a handful of short story ideas pronto.

I'm a one-project writer. I have to finish one story before I can move on to the next. Even in the same universe. I can't work in two universes at the same time. So. If I am to take advantage of these opportunities, I'm going to have to read/research/brainstorm in two radically different game universes while writing a realistic, contemporary mystery novel. Never too old to learn a new skill set, I guess.

10 comments:

Zinnia Cyclamen said...

Good luck! I'm a one-at-a-time person too, but I've heard others manage different books/projects by e.g. working on one in the mornings and one in the afternoons - or, in one case I read about, using two different desks, one for each book/series they were working on. Maybe even something small, like using one mug for drinks when you're working on one project and a different one when you're working on another, could help.

Rowan Coleman said...

you can do it Kevin!

Leatherdykeuk said...

Good luck. I already multi-task but I'd hate to be writing in three separate genres.

CC Devine said...

It's going to be tough to compartmentalise but Zinnia's suggestions sound very sensible. I guess you'll have to experiment until you find what works for you.

Best of luck!

Crystal Jigsaw said...

I so admire you for being disciplined. Something I really need to learn how to do.

Good luck with it all.

Crystal xx

Debs said...

Best of luck. It sounds like you're going to be rather busy.

Lane said...

Two different workspaces sounds like a good idea. (Wouldn't work in my house though:-(

Good luck with it.

L-Plate Author said...

Good luck Kevin. I can't even decide between two ideas for my next book and I'm starting it on Monday! :o

wordtryst said...

Yes, you can do it. I write in three or four different genres, but not at the same time. Good luck.

KeVin K. said...

Multiple work spaces sounds good. I can write one at Prot City Java and another at Connection Cafe and ...
I'll have to find a third coffee shop.

Yesterday I received the initial overview of the new game universe. I think I can say it's a role playing game set in a pretty intriguing dystopia, but beyond that I'm bound by my non-disclosure agreement. I'll be getting access to the game developer's complete notes, the play testers observations, and the evolving concept as soon as their IT guy sets things up so I can log in to their server.

My job will be developing characters and stories which will showcase the needs/abilities/etc., of some of the various character creation archetypes. Fluff. Ask someone who plays RPGs what I'm talking about. Last night I read over the material so ideas could be percolating in the back of my mind.

I felt pretty sure none of the eldritch creatures of the game would work their way into Coastal, Carolina. And I was right, as far as that goes.
But an unforeseen effect was that today's writing in my mystery novel read like the overview I'd read last night. It was a chunk of needed backstory -- information that needs to be in the story because it provides an insight into motivation -- but I summarized it.
Today I produced 2400 words of good reference material -- NOT part of the novel ms.